‘Hija ko 'yan’: Sharon, Kiko back Frankie in standing up against victim-blaming | Inquirer Entertainment
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‘Hija ko ‘yan’: Sharon, Kiko back Frankie in standing up against victim-blaming

/ 01:54 PM June 15, 2020
sharon cuneta, kiko pangilinan, frankie pangilinan

Kiko Pangilinan and Sharon Cuneta (L) have shown support for their daughter Frankie (R) who has been vocal against rape culture. Image: Instagram/@reallysharoncuneta, @frankiepangilinan

Actress Sharon Cuneta and Senator Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan expressed support for their daughter Frankie Pangilinan as she stands up for women being blamed for incidents of sexual misconduct.

Their statements came after TV personality Ben Tulfo criticized Frankie in Twitter and Facebook with a message that said women should watch what they wear or else they will “invite the beast.”

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Frankie’s no-nonsense reply — where she reclaimed the word “hija” that Tulfo used on her — has spurred discussions on Twitter about rape culture.

The hashtag #hijaako has been trending on Twitter as women recount their own harrowing experiences of sexual violence, including what they wore at the time of the incident.

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Cuneta defended her daughter’s points, tweeting yesterday, “You mean people shouldn’t count those who’ve been raped and murdered in the dead of winter in some other country, stripped of all their ‘uninviting,’ thick, layered winter clothing?”

“My very own ‘hija,’ MIJA, whom I brought into this world, I am incredibly proud of you. #hijakoyan,” she told Frankie.

Cuneta also emphasized that clothes would not make a difference to one’s intentions: “Kahit nakamaong, sweater na turtleneck at makapal na jacket ka pa, kung may masama ang iniisip, masama ang gagawin.”

(Whether you are wearing jeans and a thick turtleneck sweater, if there is someone who has harmful intentions, that person will harm you.)

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“Pero kung matinong tao kahit pa nakatwo-piece ka sa beach at dumaan ka sa harap niya, wala lang,” she said.

(But a good person will not harm you whether you are wearing a two-piece at the beach and pass by. It’s nothing.)

Kiko backed his daughter for fighting for what she believes in, comparing it to how his own father must have looked at him as a student activist during martial law.

“Ngayon alam ko na ang naging pakiramdam ng Tatay ko nung isa akong nagmamartsa, nakikibaka at lumalaban na lider estudyante sa UP Diliman nung ‘80s nung panahon ng Diktadura,” he tweeted yesterday.

(I know now how my dad felt when I was marching, protesting and fighting as a student leader at University of the Philippines Diliman in the 1980s, during the time of the dictatorship.)

“Pasensya na Daddy, ikaw din ang nagturo sa akin na mahalaga ang pagiging lider nung bata pa ako,” he said.

(Sorry Daddy, you were the one who also taught me that it is important to be a leader since I was young.)

“Go ahead then, @kakiep83,” he encouraged his daughter. “As my Father, your Lolo Dony, sought to understand what I did then despite the risks, so it is with me and you.” JB

RELATED STORIES:

Frankie Pangilinan fires back at Ben Tulfo on blaming women for sexual abuse

‘It’s not my shame’: Why Filipino women are calling out sexual misconduct on social media

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TAGS: Ben Tulfo, Frankie Pangilinan, Kiko Pangilinan, rape culture, sexual abuse, sexual misconduct, Sharon Cuneta, victim blaming
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